Anxiety in the midst of a thunderstorm

I was cleaning up some dishes in the kitchen the other day while my son took his nap and heard the first roll of thunder outside. A storm was approaching – the NWS had issued a severe weather warning – and while I typically enjoy daytime thunderstorms, the introduction of “nap time” into my life via parenthood has changed that to some extent. I haven’t figured out how to balance my attention when kiddo is awake, so when he sleeps is when I get my errands done. Anything that threatens to cut short that block of time is now the enemy.

I began washing dishes faster and I could feel my pulse quicken. The thunder was getting louder and I was certain that any minute I’d hear the cries of my now-awake kiddo in the baby monitor.

Matthew 6:25 says “Do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more important than food, and the body more important than clothes?” Jesus tacks on later “Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to his life?” (v.27). This passage comes on the heels of admonitions against hoarding treasures and resources here on this Earth, “where moth and rust destroy, where thieves break in and steal” (v.19), and can be understood plainly as an illustration that storing up treasures on Earth is a symptom of worrying about one’s life. Jesus says that there is no need to store up treasures on Earth because (a) forces of this world only lead to their breakdown and (b) God is the one who takes care of His people and provides all that is needed. Jesus calls God the “heavenly Father” (v.26) and in the same thought describes our heavenly Father as one who gives “good gifts” to those who ask of Him (7:11). God knows our needs, and provides for our needs, because He is a good Father – not a fickle, domineering deity like those that appear in other religions past and present – and therefore we should trust him rather than worry or be anxious.

1 Peter 5:7 reiterates this, saying “Cast all your anxiety on Him, because He cares for you.” While Matthew 6:25 might possibly be read to limit itself to matters of urgent necessity – food and protection from the elements (clothing) – this verse in 1 Peter is all-encompassing. “Cast ALL your anxiety on Him” (emphasis added). God sees our day-to-day lives in their entirety and knows the things that make us anxious. These things frequently go beyond the urgent necessity and include other matters of the day like “will I be able to finish my assignment on time?”, “can I pass this test?”, “is my boss satisfied with my work?”, and any number of other things. Some things may not be truly urgent, being seen in hindsight as fleeting or baseless worries, while others may be urgent even if they are not a matter of life and death. 1 Peter says that all things that make us anxious can be lifted up to our Father in heaven, because He hears them and He cares about what gives us distress. This includes the worry I was having about my son being awakened from his nap early by an approaching thunderstorm.

Paul gives us some instruction regarding how to approach God with our worries. In Philippians 4:6-7 he writes, “Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.” Verse 6 is prescriptive: approach God with your petitions along with your gratitude for the ways in which He has already blessed and provided for you. It’s important to have both, it seems, and this makes sense because it helps keep our perspective balanced. Without practicing gratitude, we aren’t acknowledging that God does provide for us. God is infinitely more gracious and loving than any human, but given that human relationships become strained if there is only petition and no thanksgiving it seems logical to reason that one’s relationship with God might become similarly strained in the absence of gratitude. We can feel free to ask God for what we feel we need, and bring to Him our anxieties, all the while thanking Him for the ways that He has provided for our needs and alleviated our anxieties in the past.

And what is God’s response to this prescribed approach? Verse 7 does not say “And God will give you that which you request” because this isn’t the point of this verse. Elsewhere the Bible addresses what God will give in response to requests, but here it says that God will give us His peace “which transcends all understanding”. I love the sound of this because in the midst of my own worries I sometimes wonder how I am going to “snap out of it”, or if I can at all. And the answer is that I cannot, on my own. But the peace of God transcends all that we can wrap our minds around and allows us to feel His peace in the midst of any storm, trial, or anxiety. What relief!

God sees all of our anxieties and hears all of the worry in our heart. And how does He respond? Like a good Father would: patience, provision, and love. 1 John 3:1 says “How great is the love the Father has lavished on us, that we should be called children of God!” My own “fathering” is flawed by my sinfulness and fallenness, but God’s fathering is perfect and the ways He responds to our distress and anxious cries is perfectly fit into the big picture, which we cannot see but which He can see, residing beyond the limitations of our temporal dimension. The ways in which the Father lavishes His love upon us are done so in the ways that we truly need – not necessarily the ways that we ask for at the time. Romans 8:28 says “We know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him, who have been called according to His purpose.” Part of love is trust, and when we trust in God’s workings in our lives we trust that the ways in which He responds to our cries is for our greater good – even if it doesn’t seem to match what we were hoping for in the moment.

Trust in God, faith in God, therefore, means believing that God sees us, hears us, knows us, and cares for us. He is a good Father and cares about the things we worry about, and provides for those things we need and those things that will help us work within the plan He has laid out for us (His purpose, cf. Rom. 8:28). And given that this plan is “for [our] good”, this means that the way in which something plays out is the way in which God anticipated it playing out. It might be wonderful for us now, or it might not be. Near the end of Jesus’ ministry on this Earth, He told His disciples “I have told you these things so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” (John 16:33). We worry about things, and God knows our worry and wants us to bring those worries to Him. Things may not turn out all sunshine-and-rainbows, but God gives us peace to reside even within the troubles of this world if we can cling to the knowledge that He is fitting this all together into a plan that will turn out beautifully in the end. If we can cling to that knowledge in faith, then we can let go of our anxiety and know that what happens is what God allows to happen, and what God allows to happen is ultimately good for His people. If what is about to happen is good, then instead of worrying about what might happen it may be possible to actually look forward to what will happen. But clinging to that knowledge in faith takes practice – it doesn’t magically happen, and it doesn’t continually happen. Reminders to oneself about God’s faithfulness are vital.

The thunderstorm ended up bringing very little rain to our neighborhood, and the thunder seemed to remain in the distance. My son slept through his nap time peacefully and woke up at the normal time in a wonderful mood.

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